Chris Sherman’s article on Search Engine Watch, “Local Search, With A Visual Twist,” highlights MetroBot, a local business search engine with a unique graphical interface. You can search for businesses by name, category, address, or city. Then, you get to virtually stroll down the street, looking at other businesses nearby. This will certainly help yours truly, as I remember where places are by what they’re next to (typical female spatiality, I know).

The amazing Roy Tennant has written a great article for Library Journal about strategies for keeping current with technology. I think this is a useful resource to point out to colleagues, supervisors, etc.

Looking to learn about digital preservation of all sorts? Check out Cornell’s Digital Preservation Tutorial–an excellent introduction to the general principles and considerations when planning a project.

Jack me in, Neo

January 14, 2004 | Comments (0)

According to a Wired News article, five quadriplegic patients might be months away from testing a brain-computer interface, BrainGate, created by Cyberkinetics. It would allow the patients to control electronic devices (e.g. computers and robots) with their thoughts. The first step toward Neal Stephenson’s mod shops.

CNN is running a story about the first World Internet Project report, which challenges the “Internet-Geek” stereotype that, frankly, I thought had already been shattered ten times over. Oh well, apparently an official report makes it more legitimate. Whatever. Both of my grandmothers are web and e-mail savvy. I think that shatters the stereotype right there.

Dr. Jeffrey Record’s article, “Bounding the Global War on Terrorism,” is sure to be a kick in the face to the administration. Below is the summary, but you can also get a PDF of the article on this page.

The author examines three features of the war on terrorism as currently defined and conducted: (1) the administration’s postulation of the terrorist threat, (2) the scope and feasibility of U.S. war aims, and (3) the war’s political, fiscal, and military sustainability. He believes that the war on terrorism–as opposed to the campaign against al-Qaeda–lacks strategic clarity, embraces unrealistic objectives, and may not be sustainable over the long haul. He calls for downsizing the scope of the war on terrorism to reflect concrete U.S. security interests and the limits of American military power.

Salon.com has a great cartoon about the government associating almanac carrying with terrorism.

OK, so I’m a goth freak who still thinks Morrissey is god. A somewhat self-deceiving and pretentious god, but hey, still a god. Just found a 1985 interview where he says he always wanted to be a librarian. Oh, Morrissey. You are just full of surprises. Every day is like Sunday baby, every day is like Sunday.

A colleague from Library school, the venerable James Jacobs, has a swell blog entitled the Library Autonomous Zone. He covers issues of civil liberties, copyright, digital library issues, fair use, technology, media regulation, open access, and more. And, of course, there’s an RSS feed. Check it out! [OK James, you owe me a beer next time I’m in San Diego] ;)

My Hacker Hero

January 12, 2004 | Comments (2)

Adrian Lamo, dubbed the Homeless Hacker for his penchant for moving from house to house to avoid capture, has cut a deal with the Feds. Lamo admits to one felony count (for accessing the New York Times poorly guarded computers) and faces 6-12 months in prison. This guy is smart, white-hat hacks into networks to expose security flaws, and then lets the company know about it. I think it’s bunk that he’s getting nailed for doing what the companies should be doing themselves. Just exposes our tech-illiterate justice system for what it is. For more info, check out the Wired News story. Good luck Adrian.