…they have a fight, Flat-Panel-Man wins, Flat-Panel Man… (sung to the tune of They Might Be Giants’ “Particle Man”). So, yeah. For the first time, global shipments of liquid crystal displays in 2004 will surpass those of cathode ray tube (CRT) units, market research firm IDC said Thursday. It’s about time. See the story here.

eragon.jpg LiB’s favorite book of recent years, Eragon, is being made into a movie. Peter Buchman will be writng the script. Buchman wrote the script for Jurassic Park III. That particular film got really awful reviews, but Buchman has a lot of good material to work with in Eragon. Who will they cast as Eragon himself, do you think? My current vote is for Spencer Treat Clark (from Gladiator, Unbreakable, and Mystic River). To me, he just has the look…

For my California readers, the state launched a new site today helping voters figure out what’s what. The California Online Voter Guide gives ballot information, where to register to vote, where to vote (for me, the place seems to change from one election to the next), and links to other voter info sites.

A Red Dwarf Movie?

February 19, 2004 | Comment (1)
Fans of the Red Dwarf series will be thrilled to hear that in a recent interview, Chris Barrie (AKA Arnold Rimmer) has stated that a Red Dwarf movie (to star the original cast) is in the early stages of development. Whoo hoo! reddwarf.jpg

eHistory

February 19, 2004 | Comments (0)

While the homepage of this online history resource is not particularly impressive, the sheer amount of information it contains is overwhelming. eHistory contains over 130,000 pages of historical content; 5,300 timeline events; 800 battle outlines; 350 biographies; and thousands of images and maps. Just as an example, if you go into maps, and choose Maps of the Civil War, you get 26 large, quality, color maps of various areas, battles, and events (such as the progress of emancipation). This is an extremely detailed resource, and one I’ll keep in my back pocket for those tough history homework questions I get on the virtual ref desk.

For all the true animation freaks out there: Iowa State University’s Chronology of Animation. A truly extensive resource.

An interesting Woman’s Day competition rewards the best essay with a day as a Librarian. Interesing PR for libraries I guess, though somehow it makes me feel like the profession is being devalued a little, as though any person can just waltz in and start doing reference. But, perhaps I’m just being defensive after having to come up with a reply for the thousandth time to the inevitable random-relative question: “So, you’re a librarian? Why do you have to have a degree to do that? All you do is read stories to kids and stamp books.” *sigh* My canned response so far is to state that I am an information broker, just like a stock broker, except I deal in information, and my services are free. Does anyone have any other good responses to that oh-so-fun question?

The Nebo School District in Utah created an insane number of PowerPoint presentations with money from a TLCF Professional Development Grant. They cover school-aged topics like the Pledge of Allegiance, Apollo 11, Martin Luther King, Proper Keyboarding, Bobcats, Gravity, the ABCs, Erosion, Microbiology, Spain, the Civil War, Van Gogh, Geometry, the list goes on… All in all, when printed out, they have 12 pages of presentations! I contacted the webmaster and he states that the site is meant as a resource for educators, and teachers are welcome to use them in the classroom. But, if they are to be used in any type of commercial venture, the teacher’s permission would need to be obtained. And, as always, all proper citation of this site as the source of the materials is expected. A great resource, hiding there on the web…Enjoy!

Which geeks look down upon which other geeks?
Which pagans look down upon which other pagans?
Frighteningly, as both a science fiction fan and someone who studied mythology, I rank rather highly on both charts.

Barcode Yourself

February 18, 2004 | Comments (2)
barcode.jpg As barcodes abound in our libraries–on our books, on our library cards–now we get to barcode ourselves! To the left, you see LiB’s barcode. You can diagram, print, and scan your barcode. Apparently, I am worth $6.85. A great bargain! I think at our next All Staff Day, we should wear these instead of nametags.